TIME, Microsoft, MPAA host Creativity Conference

WASHINGTON, DC: PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON, KEYNOTE SPEAKER, THE CREATIVITY CONFERENCE, SPONSORED BY TIME MAGAZINE, MICROSOFT AND THE MOTION PICTURE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA.

"It would greatly help to have an explicit innovation budget in federal government." — President Bill Clinton

On April 26, Sean Kelly was thrilled to participate in a unique event:

In Washington, DC, The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) convened leaders from the world of politics, media, business and government to engage in a direct dialogue about the role creativity plays in our economy and in creating the workforce of the future.

The Creativity Conference brought together many of the most important artists and innovators of our time from all parts of society for a mediated conversation about spurring growth and opportunity based on creativity.
STEVEN BATHICHE, MICROSOFT

Panelists and speakers included President Bill Clinton, TIME Magazine Managing Editor Rick Stengel, film studio executive Harvey Weinstein, internet pioneer Ted Leonis, PBS President Paula Kerger, Microsoft Scientist Steven Bathiche, Aspen Institute CEO Walter Isaacson, and the chairman and CEO of the MPAA Chris Dodd.

They discussed questions that are fundamental to the future of the country — from the push to develop environments that inspire creativity to how our leaders can harness the power of a workforce that is moving from industrial manufacturing to the tapping of the creative mind.
"Develop a space, an environment, where creative people can be inspired, take risks, and fail."  
— Paula Kerger, President, CEO of PBS
Working with the Motion Picture Association of America and Microsoft, TIME polled Americans about creativity in the workplace, schools and government. Does the U.S. still have the momentum to be a global leader in innovation? Is our creativity being harnessed at work? The results are encouraging—and not.
"More than 50% of creative ideas are horrible. But how do we say 'no' without tamping down creativity?" 
— Walter Isaacson, President, CEO of The Aspen Institute
Creativity is a renewable resource, one that’s universally, if not evenly, distributed. We don’t decide how much we get, but it’s up to each of us—and the nation as a whole—to tap what’s there.

CHART FROM TIME MAGAZINE:



Source: TIME Magazine

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